Purpose of the flight and payload description

The Driftsonde observing system was developed by NCAR to produce vertical profiles of in-situ measurements, at a low cost above oceans, remote Artic, Antarctic, or continental regions where in-situ measurements from radiosondes are not possible from the ground or from aircraft, and regions covered with extensive cloud shields so that satellite measurements are limited.

The Driftsonde gondola houses the system electronics which includes an embedded computer, a GPS navigation system, flight level Pressure Temperature Humidity (PTH) sensors, a battery power system, an Iridium satellite two-way connmunication system, a 400 MHz receiver for dropsonde telemetry, and up to approximately 50 dropsonde tubes for the Miniature In-situ Sounding Technology (MIST) dropsonde.

The MIST dropsondes can be dropped down under parachute from the altitude of the carrier balloon to the ground, reaching a landing speed of about 7 m/s. During the descent through the atmosphere, the radiosonde makes measurements once per second, including GPS position, temperature, pressure and humidity. The radiosonde measurements are transmitted to the Driftsonde gondola by a Radio Frequence link in the 400 MHZ band, and then relayed to the operation control center via the Iridium satellite communications system. The radiosondes can be automatically released at predetermined times by the onboard computer or on command through the Iridium satellite link between the Driftsonde gondola using a WEB based system.

These elements were transported onboard a zero pressure balloon developed by Zodiac with a volume of 10.000 m3.

Details of the balloon flight

Balloon launched on: 9/8/2008 at 15:53
Launch site: Near Space Corporation launch base, Ocean View, Hawaii, USA  
Balloon launched by: Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES)
Balloon manufacturer/size/composition: Zero Pressure Balloon model 10zl 10.000 m3
End of flight (L for landing time, W for last contact, otherwise termination time): 9/12/2008 at 12:30

This flight was part of the T-PARC (THORPEX - Pacific Asian Regional Campaign) which is a project of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), which was set up With the main objective to obtain information on key atmospheric parameters to help mitigate the effects of natural meteorological disasters and to try minimizing the human and economic disastrous impacts of these events.

External references

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